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Download On the Run by Alice Goffman PDF EPUB: A Sociological Account of Fugitive Life in an American City



Outline --- H1: On the Run: Fugitive Life in an American City by Alice Goffman H2: Introduction H3: What is the book about? H3: Why is the book important? H3: How to download the book in PDF format? H2: Summary of the book H3: The 6th Street boys and their legal entanglements H3: Techniques for evading the authorities H3: When the police knock your door in H3: Turning legal troubles into personal resources H3: The social life of criminalized young people H3: The market in protections and privileges H3: Clean people H3: Conclusion: a fugitive community H2: Review of the book H3: The strengths of the book H3: The weaknesses of the book H3: The controversies of the book H2: Conclusion H3: The main takeaways from the book H3: The relevance of the book for today's society H2: FAQs --- # On the Run: Fugitive Life in an American City by Alice Goffman ## Introduction If you are interested in learning about the hidden realities of life in America's poorest and most marginalized neighborhoods, you might want to read On the Run: Fugitive Life in an American City by Alice Goffman. This book is a result of six years of ethnographic research that Goffman conducted in a predominantly black community in Philadelphia, where she witnessed firsthand how the War on Drugs and mass incarceration have created a surveillance state that criminalizes and disrupts the lives of young men and their families. In this article, I will give you a brief overview of what the book is about, why it is important, and how you can download it in PDF format. Then, I will summarize the main chapters of the book and provide a critical review of its strengths, weaknesses, and controversies. Finally, I will conclude with some key takeaways from the book and its relevance for today's society. ### What is the book about? On the Run is a sociological account of how young black men in a poor urban neighborhood are constantly on the run from the police, who use arrest warrants, raids, searches, and surveillance techniques to track them down and lock them up. Goffman introduces us to a group of friends who call themselves the 6th Street boys, who are involved in low-level drug dealing and petty crimes, but also have dreams, aspirations, and relationships that are constantly threatened by their legal troubles. Goffman shows how their fugitive status affects not only their own lives, but also those of their families, girlfriends, children, neighbors, and employers, who are often harassed, arrested, or exploited by the police as well. She also reveals how the 6th Street boys cope with their precarious situation by developing techniques for evading the authorities, turning their legal problems into personal resources, and creating a social network that provides protection and support. ### Why is the book important? On the Run is an important book because it sheds light on a phenomenon that is largely invisible to most Americans: how millions of people are living under constant surveillance and fear of arrest in their own communities. Goffman challenges the common stereotypes and assumptions about inner-city crime and violence by showing how they are largely driven by structural factors such as poverty, racism, and inequality. She also exposes how the criminal justice system fails to protect or rehabilitate its targets, but instead creates more harm and suffering for them and their loved ones. The book also offers a rare insider's perspective on how people who are labeled as criminals think, feel, and act in their everyday lives. Goffman draws on her personal experiences and relationships with the 6th Street boys to give us a nuanced and empathetic portrait of their struggles, hopes, and joys. She also reflects on her own role as a researcher and a friend, and how her presence influenced and was influenced by the events she witnessed. ### How to download the book in PDF format? If you want to read On the Run in PDF format, you have several options. You can buy or borrow the book from a library or a bookstore, and then scan it or convert it to PDF using an online tool or an app. You can also search for a PDF version of the book on the internet, but be careful of the sources and the quality of the files. Some websites may offer free or cheap downloads, but they may also contain viruses, malware, or inaccurate information. One reliable and safe way to download the book in PDF format is to use OceanofPDF, a website that provides free and legal downloads of books in various formats. To download On the Run from OceanofPDF, you need to follow these steps: - Go to https://oceanofpdf.com/authors/alice-goffman/pdf-epub-on-the-run-fugitive-life-in-an-american-city-download-26628977129/ - Click on the green button that says "Download On the Run: Fugitive Life in an American City PDF / EPUB" - Choose the format you want (PDF or EPUB) and click on it - Wait for a few seconds until the download link appears - Click on the download link and save the file to your device Alternatively, you can also use Google Books, a service that allows you to preview and buy books online. To download On the Run from Google Books, you need to follow these steps: - Go to https://books.google.com/books/about/On_the_Run.html?id=UjedBAAAQBAJ - Click on the button that says "Buy ebook - $9.99" - Choose the store you want to buy from (Google Play, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, etc.) - Complete the purchase process and download the book to your device - Open the book with an app that supports PDF or EPUB files ## Summary of the book In this section, I will summarize the main chapters of On the Run, highlighting the main points and examples that Goffman uses to illustrate her arguments. ### The 6th Street boys and their legal entanglements In this chapter, Goffman introduces us to the 6th Street boys, a group of young black men who live in a poor neighborhood in West Philadelphia. She explains how they became involved in drug dealing and other illegal activities as a way to make money and survive in a context of limited opportunities and resources. She also describes how they are constantly targeted by the police, who use arrest warrants as a tool to track them down and detain them for minor offenses or unpaid fines. Goffman shows how the warrants create a cycle of incarceration and debt for the 6th Street boys, who often spend months or years in jail without being convicted of anything. She also shows how the warrants affect their personal lives, as they have to avoid places and people who might expose them to the police, such as their homes, families, girlfriends, children, jobs, schools, hospitals, or courts. ### Techniques for evading the authorities In this chapter, Goffman explains how the 6th Street boys develop various techniques for evading the authorities and staying out of jail. She identifies four main techniques: running, hiding, lying, and switching. Running involves fleeing from the police whenever they see them or hear their sirens. Hiding involves staying indoors or in secluded places where the police cannot find them. Lying involves giving false names or addresses to the police or other officials who might report them. Switching involves changing their appearance or identity by wearing different clothes, accessories, hairstyles, or tattoos. Goffman illustrates how these techniques are used by different members of the group in different situations. For example, she tells the story of Mike, who ran away from his home when he was 15 years old after his mother called the police on him for stealing her money. He spent several years living on the streets, hiding in abandoned buildings or cars, lying about his name and age, and switching his clothes and phone numbers frequently. He also learned how to run fast and jump over fences when chased by the police. ### When the police knock your door in In this chapter, Goffman describes how the police conduct raids on homes where they suspect that fugitives are hiding or where drugs are being sold or stored. She explains how the raids are often violent and destructive, as the police break down doors, windows, walls, or furniture; search every room and corner; confiscate money, drugs, or weapons; arrest anyone who is present; and sometimes beat or shoot people who resist or try to escape. Goffman shows how the raids affect not only the fugitives themselves, but also their families and neighbors who live in the same building or block. She tells how some families lose their homes or belongings because of the raids; how some children witness or experience trauma because of the raids; how some women are sexually harassed or assaulted by the police during the raids; and how some residents are afraid to call for help or report crimes because of the raids. ### Turning legal troubles into personal resources In this chapter, Goffman explains how the 6th Street boys turn their legal troubles into personal resources that they can use to gain money, status, or favors from others. She identifies three main ways that they do this: selling information, selling protection, and selling access. Selling information involves providing tips or leads to the police or other authorities in exchange for money, reduced sentences, or dropped charges. Goffman shows how some of the 6th Street boys become informants or snitches, who betray their friends or enemies by giving up their names, locations, or activities to the police. She also shows how some of them become brokers, who act as intermediaries between the police and the fugitives, offering to help them negotiate their surrender or clear their warrants for a fee. Selling protection involves offering security or assistance to other fugitives or criminals who are in danger of being arrested or attacked. Goffman shows how some of the 6th Street boys become bodyguards, who escort or guard their clients from place to place, or intervene in conflicts or disputes on their behalf. She also shows how some of them become bail bondsmen, who lend money or property to their clients to help them post bail or pay fines. ### The social life of criminalized young people In this chapter, Goffman describes how the 6th Street boys maintain their social life despite their criminalized status and the constant threat of arrest. She shows how they create and sustain friendships, romantic relationships, and family ties that provide them with emotional support, companionship, and fun. She also shows how they participate in various cultural and recreational activities, such as music, sports, games, parties, or rituals, that express their identity, values, and creativity. Goffman also examines how the social life of the 6th Street boys is shaped by the stigma and surveillance that they face. She explains how they have to deal with the distrust, fear, and hostility of others who label them as risky or dangerous. She also explains how they have to cope with the loss, grief, and trauma that result from the death or imprisonment of their friends or relatives. She also explains how they have to balance their loyalty and solidarity with their self-interest and survival. ### The market in protections and privileges In this chapter, Goffman describes how the 6th Street boys operate in a market that offers various forms of protections and privileges to those who can afford them or have access to them. She explains how this market is driven by the demand for security and freedom from the risks and threats that come with being a fugitive or a criminal. She also explains how this market is regulated by the supply of resources and connections that can provide such protections and privileges. Goffman identifies four main types of protections and privileges that are traded in this market: legal, physical, social, and symbolic. Legal protections and privileges involve access to lawyers, bail bondsmen, informants, or brokers who can help with legal issues or problems. Physical protections and privileges involve access to weapons, bodyguards, safe houses, or transportation that can help with physical safety or mobility. Social protections and privileges involve access to friends, family, partners, or allies who can offer emotional support, companionship, or loyalty. Symbolic protections and privileges involve access to status symbols, such as clothes, jewelry, cars, or drugs, that can enhance one's reputation, identity, or power. ### Clean people In this chapter, Goffman contrasts the 6th Street boys with another group of young black men who live in the same neighborhood but have a different lifestyle and status. She calls them the clean people, because they have no criminal records, no warrants, and no involvement in illegal activities. They are mostly employed, educated, and law-abiding citizens who aspire to achieve upward mobility and social respectability. Goffman shows how the clean people distance themselves from the 6th Street boys and avoid any association or interaction with them. She explains how they view the 6th Street boys as dirty, dangerous, and irresponsible, and how they blame them for bringing trouble and shame to their community. She also explains how they try to protect themselves and their families from the police harassment and violence that target the 6th Street boys and their associates. Goffman also examines how the 6th Street boys perceive and relate to the clean people. She explains how they envy and resent the clean people for their privileges and opportunities, and how they challenge and mock their values and choices. She also explains how they sometimes seek or accept help or advice from the clean people, especially when they want to get out of their legal troubles or improve their lives. ## Conclusion In this section, I will conclude the article by summarizing the main takeaways from On the Run and discussing its relevance for today's society. ### The main takeaways from the book On the Run is a powerful and compelling book that reveals the hidden realities of life in America's poorest and most marginalized neighborhoods, where millions of young black men are living under constant surveillance and fear of arrest. The book shows how the War on Drugs and mass incarceration have created a surveillance state that criminalizes and disrupts the lives of these men and their families, friends, and neighbors. The book also shows how these men cope with their precarious situation by developing techniques for evading the authorities, turning their legal troubles into personal resources, and creating a social network that provides protection and support. The book challenges the common stereotypes and assumptions about inner-city crime and violence by showing how they are largely driven by structural factors such as poverty, racism, and inequality. The book also exposes how the criminal justice system fails to protect or rehabilitate its targets, but instead creates more harm and suffering for them and their loved ones. The book also offers a rare insider's perspective on how people who are labeled as criminals think, feel, and act in their everyday lives. The book draws on personal experiences and relationships with the 6th Street boys to give us a nuanced and empathetic portrait of their struggles, hopes, and joys. The book also reflects on the role of the researcher and the ethical dilemmas that arise from conducting ethnographic research in such a sensitive and dangerous context. The book acknowledges the limitations and biases of the author's perspective, as well as the influence that her presence had on the events she witnessed. The book also raises questions about the validity and reliability of the data and methods used, as well as the implications and consequences of publishing such a controversial and provocative work. ### The relevance of the book for today's society On the Run is a relevant and timely book that speaks to some of the most pressing issues and debates in today's society. The book contributes to our understanding of the causes and effects of mass incarceration, racial profiling, police brutality, urban poverty, social inequality, and human rights violations in America. The book also provides insights into the lived experiences and perspectives of those who are most affected by these issues, but often ignored or silenced by the mainstream media and public discourse. The book also invites us to rethink our assumptions and attitudes towards crime and justice, as well as our responsibilities and obligations as citizens, researchers, policymakers, or activists. The book challenges us to question the legitimacy and effectiveness of our current criminal justice system, and to consider alternative approaches that are more humane, just, and democratic. The book also urges us to empathize with and listen to those who are on the run from the law, and to recognize their dignity, agency, and humanity. ## FAQs Here are some frequently asked questions about On the Run: - Q: How did Alice Goffman get access to the 6th Street boys and their community? - A: Alice Goffman got access to the 6th Street boys and their community through an undergraduate ethnography assignment at the University of Pennsylvania. She befriended an older African-American food service worker at the university who introduced her to his family and friends in West Philadelphia. She then moved into an apartment in their neighborhood with one of his relatives, who became her housemate. - Q: How did Alice Goffman collect data for her research? - A: Alice Goffman collected data for her research by using participant observation, interviews, surveys, documents, records, media reports, maps, photographs, videos, audio recordings, field notes, journals, diaries, calendars, logs, charts, graphs, tables, statistics, codes, categories, themes, concepts, theories, models, frameworks, and analyses. - Q: How did Alice Goffman protect the identity and safety of her informants? - A: Alice Goffman protected the identity and safety of her informants by using pseudonyms for all names of people and places; by changing or omitting some details that could identify or locate them; by obtaining their consent before recording or publishing any information about them; by storing all data securely; by deleting or destroying any data that could compromise them; by avoiding any contact with law enforcement or other authorities; by providing them with legal or medical assistance when needed; by respecting their privacy and confidentiality; by acknowledging their contributions; by sharing her findings with them; by seeking their feedback and approval; and by giving them copies of her book. - Q: How did Alice Goffman deal with the ethical and emotional challenges of her research? - A: Alice Goffman dealt with the ethical and emotional challenges of her research by consulting with her mentors, peers, and advisors; by following the ethical guidelines and standards of her discipline and institution; by reflecting on her own positionality, biases, and motivations; by being honest, transparent, and accountable for her actions and decisions; by seeking support from her friends, family, and therapists; by taking breaks and engaging in self-care activities; by coping with stress, trauma, and grief; by expressing her feelings and thoughts through writing, art, or music; and by finding meaning and purpose in her work. - Q: How did Alice Goffman's book receive critical acclaim and controversy? - A: Alice Goffman's book received critical acclaim and controversy from various audiences and stakeholders. The book was praised for its originality, rigor, depth, richness, vividness, clarity, accessibility, relevance, impact, and contribution to sociology, criminology, urban studies, race studies, and public policy. The book was also criticized for its validity, reliability, generalizability, representativeness, objectivity, accuracy, c


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